It’s the little circuit board that has captured the hearts and minds of the makers, the tinkerers, and the hackers.

But the Raspberry Pi is more than that. It is the gateway to the Internet of things, and the tool to teach the next generation how to create it.

In 2006, some great minds at the University of Cambridge’s computer lab started to notice a difference in the applicants for the schools Computer Science program. The hackers, hobbyists and electronics aficionados that made up the bulk of the students applying in the 1990s had been replaced by folks with little to no experience in the darker arts and if anything, had mostly web-programming experience. While there’s nothing wrong with web-programming, the world needs nerds, too. They got together and did what they could do to tackle the problem, and the Raspberry Pi was born. Fast forward to the 2010s, and the idea has blossomed into the Raspberry Pi Foundation and a low-cost, highly-capable single board computer — the Raspberry Pi — is available to help teach computer science and electronics to both this generation of makers as well as the next.




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